Father of rescued teen gives thanks, asks for privacy - San Diego, California Talk Radio Station - 760 KFMB AM - 760kfmb

Father of rescued teen gives thanks, asks for privacy

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Standing out in front of the Ada County Sheriff's Office in Boise, witnesses, from left to right, Mary Young, Mike Young, Mark John and Christa John speak with news reporters Sunday Aug. 11, 2013 about their sighting of Hannah Anderson and James DiMaggio Standing out in front of the Ada County Sheriff's Office in Boise, witnesses, from left to right, Mary Young, Mike Young, Mark John and Christa John speak with news reporters Sunday Aug. 11, 2013 about their sighting of Hannah Anderson and James DiMaggio
This combination of undated file photos provided by the San Diego Sheriff's Department shows James Lee DiMaggio, 40, left, and Hannah Anderson, 16. This combination of undated file photos provided by the San Diego Sheriff's Department shows James Lee DiMaggio, 40, left, and Hannah Anderson, 16.
Peggy and Tiffany Duran place signs across the street from Hannah's grandparents house, anticipating her return. Photo courtesy: News 8 Photographer Bruce Patch. Peggy and Tiffany Duran place signs across the street from Hannah's grandparents house, anticipating her return. Photo courtesy: News 8 Photographer Bruce Patch.
Hannah Anderson's father Brett Anderson addresses the media Monday, August 12. Hannah Anderson's father Brett Anderson addresses the media Monday, August 12.

SAN DIEGO (CNS) - The father of a Lakeside teen who was rescued in Idaho last weekend after being kidnapped by a family friend who also allegedly murdered her mother and younger brother asked the public Monday to grant his family privacy while his daughter recovers from her "tremendous, horrific ordeal."

"Give us our time to heal and grieve," Brett Anderson said at an afternoon news conference during which he also thanked law enforcement agencies for their work in safely recovering his 16-year-old daughter, Hannah, and the media for publicizing the search for the teen.

He also urged the public to heed missing child alerts, which he credited for leading authorities to his daughter and her abductor, 40-year-old James Lee DiMaggio of Boulevard, a longtime close friend to her family.

Sheriff's officials disclosed Monday that the girl, who went missing Aug. 3, was unaware her captor had killed her mother and brother while being held captive.

The El Capitan High School junior only learned of the murders when her rescuers told her after a FBI agent fatally shot DiMaggio during an exchange of gunfire in Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area over the weekend, San Diego County Sheriff's Bill Gore said.

"It is clear, from the information that we've received, that she was under extreme duress," Gore said. "She was taken out of the county, out of the state, clearly against her will."

Hannah was rescued near Morehead Lake in the rugged area about 80 miles northeast of Boise late Saturday afternoon. Her father flew to Idaho to reunite with her on Sunday, and she was back home as of Monday afternoon, Gore said.

Authorities began looking for the pair in the 2.3-million-acre wilderness preserve after four people riding horses there reported that they had talked to a man and a teenage girl who matched the descriptions of DiMaggio and Hannah.

DiMaggio's blue 2013 Nissan Versa was found about five miles from where the riders spotted the two Friday morning.

Three deputy federal marshals in a helicopter DiMaggio at a campsite, leading to the deadly shooting.

"We have learned from debriefing and interviewing Hannah up in Idaho that DiMaggio did have a shoulder weapon and fired at least one shot," Gore said. "The FBI will conduct an extensive shooting investigation. The results of that will be made public later."

The teenager was in "close proximity" to DiMaggio when he shot a rifle toward members of an FBI hostage-rescue team in the Idaho wilderness, prompting one of them to return fire, according to Gore. She appeared to be physically unharmed following her rescue.

"She is doing as well as could be expected after the terrible ordeal she's been through," Gore said.

Brett Anderson, who was separated from Hannah's mother, has asked the public for prayers as he and his daughter heal from both the kidnapping experience and the deaths of 44-year-old Christina Anderson and Hannah's brother, Ethan, 8.

The badly burned bodies of the mother and son were found Aug. 3 along with the remains of their family dog in the fire-gutted log-cabin home in Boulevard where DiMaggio lived. Investigators believe the suspect torched the home before fleeing with the girl.

Authorities said her mother died of blunt force trauma. Ethan's cause of death has not been determined.

Authorities have disclosed no suspected motive for the crimes, but family friends told reporters that DiMaggio seemed to have developed an infatuation with the teenager that made her uncomfortable.

Gore told reporters the girl had been subject to "extreme duress" while being held against her will by the suspect.

"I want to emphasize that during our law enforcement interviews with Hannah, it became very clear that she is a victim in every sense of the word in this horrific crime," Gore said. "She was not a willing participant."

Gore said aiding in Hannah's recovery is now a top priority in the case for local authorities.

"The kidnapper, the murderer, is dead," the sheriff said. "Our focus now is getting Hannah all the resources, the help she needs to get through this extremely traumatic ordeal that she's been through. Plus, let's not lose sight of the fact that she's lost her mother and her brother, which she was not aware of until she was recovered up in Idaho."

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