San Diegan Meb Keflezighi wins Boston Marathon - San Diego, California Talk Radio Station - 760 KFMB AM - 760kfmb

San Diegan Meb Keflezighi wins Boston Marathon

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Meb Keflezighi, of the United States, leads Josphat Boit, also from the United States, passed Wellesley College during the 118th Boston Marathon Monday, April 21, 2014 in Wellesley. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm) Meb Keflezighi, of the United States, leads Josphat Boit, also from the United States, passed Wellesley College during the 118th Boston Marathon Monday, April 21, 2014 in Wellesley. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)
BOSTON (CBS 8) - A San Diego native, Meb Keflezighi, 38, was the first American man to win the Boston Marathon since the 1980's.

On Monday, Keflezighi became the first American man to win the Boston Marathon since 1983. The former Olympian did it with a personal best of 2 hours, 8 minutes and 36 seconds.

This year's marathon marks one year since two bombs went off, killing three people and injuring hundreds.

As people cheered "Take back the finish line!" CBS News 8 Sports Director Kyle Kraska says the feeling in the city is electric.

"All Americans in some regard are Bostonians because that's what we do in this country, we rally," Kraska said.

Rally they did.

https://twitter.com/bostonmarathon/status/458276786493599746

Just one year after a tragic bombing, 36,000 runners entered the 2014 Boston Marathon. "Boston Strong" has become a message of eternal hope in the face of fear. A Bostonian himself, Kraska is visiting family and posting pictures on Facebook with pride while meeting new people from around the world and San Diego.

"This one woman Jean, she's from Mission Hills, she's running in the marathon today. She's running in her eighth Boston Marathon," Kraska said.

Whether by coincidence or by destiny, San Diegan Meb Keflezighi, was the first American man to win the race since 1983. But like many runners, they crossed the finish line for those who couldn't.

"'Boston Strong' means we don't cower, we don't give up, we rally and come together," Kraska said.

Kraska says there was a marked presence of more police officers and K-9 units at the Boston Marathon and around the city. Overall, he believes today represents a spirit to continue and to never give up.


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