AM 760 KFMB - Talk Radio Station - San Diego, CA - The Candidates Seen Through A Neurologist’s Eyes

The Candidates Seen Through A Neurologist’s Eyes

Updated: Feb 22, 2016 7:42 AM

Mike Slater welcomed neurologist Dr. Richard Cytowic M.D., to his show to find out more about an article that Dr. Cytowic had recently published analyzing the oddity of republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz.

What was it about Sen. Cruz’s face in particular that caught Dr. Cytowic’s attention?

“His face was moving in ways that really upset me,” he said. “Neurologists look at thousands of faces, so it’s automatic and we notice things that most people gloss over. Cruz’s face doesn’t move in the way normal faces move when expressing emotion.”

If you look closely at Cruz’s smile, only half of his face actually smiles while the other half frowns, so deep within our caveman brain there is a trust or distrust debate going on, the neurologist points out.

Mike and Dr. Cytowic both agree that while it’s valid to initially to question your trust based on a gut reaction to someone’s face, an individual of true higher thinking would ultimately trust or distrust someone based on their actions and track record more so than a mere odd expression.

Dr. Cytowic also commented that while watching one republican debate, he noticed that Jeb Bush blinks a lot. This is a very obvious sign of anxiety to a trained eye. In fact, there is an ideal blink-per-minute rate that that many television personalities are advised to focus on so that they come across as trustworthy to the audience.

Listen below to the full conversation between Mike and Dr. Cytowic, and try your own hand at reading the candidates at the next debate: the neurologist recommends muting the sound and observing the body language of the candidates. Do their actions speak as loudly as their words?

Part 1

Part 2

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