WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is set to give his State of the Union address Tuesday night in the Capitol where his impeachment trial is still underway. 

The president is expected to declare that the state of the union is strong, even at a time when it is bitterly divided as he asks Americans to elect him for a second four-year term. Trump has become just the third president in U.S. history to be impeached, but he's expected to be acquitted in the Senate's trial on Wednesday. 

White House aides say Trump will try to move forward in the prime-time speech before Congress, and offer an optimistic message that stresses economic growth. Trump is expected to spend much of his speech focusing on the U.S. economy and its strengths. As the Associated Press reports, he is expected to stress how blue-collar workers and the middle class have benefited. New trade agreements are expected to take center stage, including Trump's phase-one deal with China along with the United States-Mexico-Canada agreement the president signed last week. 

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Jessica Ditto, a spokesperson for the White House said, “Once again, it will present that opportunity for the American people to see how much has been done that not necessarily has been showcased."

A part about healthcare is expected in the speech, along with a call for Congress to pass legislation encouraging alternatives to traditional public schools, and mandatory paid leave for federal workers. 

In the audience, Democrats like House Representative Adam Schiff, will be in attendance. Schiff has prosecuted much of the case against the president during proceedings in the House and Senate. 

Tensions have stayed high across the aisle. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will sit over Trumps shoulder during the speech. Last year Pelosi disinvited Trump from appearing in the House chamber during a bitter border wall dispute and as the Associated Press points out, the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.